Friday, July 19, 2013

Whew, I Did It

Thanks to everyone that attended my speaking engagement at the Timberglen Branch of the Dallas Public Library. It was a small, but interested, group. I ended up having a little more material than I had time and that got me a little flustered as I tried to get through everything as quickly as possible. In my haste, I skipped (forgot) a few points that I intended to make. All in all, though, I think it went pretty well. I was even asked if I would come back again next year.

I told the wall to wall crowd of eight that I would post some of the links and information that I mentioned. Let me know if there is other information that you would like me to post.

Internet Resources:
Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center www.wildflower.org
Native Plant Society of Texas www.npsot.org
Texas Smartscape www.txsmartscape.com
The Biota of North America Program www.bonap.org
Texas Parks and Wildlife www.tpwd.state.tx.us
National Wildlife Federation www.nwf.org
Monarch Watch www.monarchwatch.org


For additional internet resources, check the links that I have in the right margin and the Blog Links tab under the header photo.

Local Sources for Native Plants:
  Native Plant Society of Texas plant sales (Sale dates vary by chapter. Generally in April.)
  Local Independent Nurseries
     Northhaven Gardens in Dallas
     Redenta’s Gardens in Dallas
     Rhode’s Nursery in Garland
     Shades of Green in Frisco
     Strong’s Nursery in Carrollton 


For part of the presentation, talked about the seasonal changes that take place in my garden. To demonstrate these changes, I showed a few photos from each season in 2012. 

Just as the seasonal changes within a year can be dramatic, so can the changes from year to year. As I was reviewing the 2012 photos, I was struck by how much greener and fuller the garden looks this year than last. I think the differences between these two years are due to variations in rainfall and temperatures. As I recall, it got hot and dry earlier in 2012. Additionally, spring came about three weeks early last year due to the exceptionally warm winter. Take a look...


07-09-12


07-18-13 There are going to be A LOT of gayfeather blooms this fall. The remaining little bluestem grass looks much better than it did last year. It is blue instead of brown.


07-09-12


07-18-13 Maybe not a lot of differences in this view, other than the stock tank was relocated. The plants look similar in growth, if not a little larger in 2012.


07-18-13 long view.


07-18-13 Pine Muhly surrounded by more gayfeather.


07-18-13 I captured a grainy image of a hummingbird feeding on red yucca flowers.


I think this bench may be calling me to sit a spell and enjoy the garden this weekend. I may listen if it is not too hot and the mosquitoes are not looking for some warm blood to feast upon.

11 comments:

  1. Yay! We knew it would go well. That's a good thing when you have so much to say about your subject you run out of time.

    Congratulations to those who attended and expressed interest in gardening with more native and waterwise plants.

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    1. Once I got going, the time flew by. I just wish I could have wrapped up a little sooner so we would have time for more questions.

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  2. I knew you would do great...wish I could have been there! Your garden looks so much more lush this year...what a difference rain makes, eh! Can't wait to see the pics of all that Liatris in flower...it's gonna look awesome!

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    1. We like rain in Texas, especially during the summer. It should be a great display of flowers this fall. We just have to get through the heat of the summer months first.

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  3. I remember my first garden club "talk". Poor. he he. At lest you put your toe in the water. How many latin names did you mispronounce?

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    1. Ahh, Greggo. I knew I would have trouble with the botanical names, so I intentionally used common names.

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  4. Interestingly it looks like the one thing that liked the dryer season better was the Mexican hat...I think that's what it is...in the second set of pictures. Or does that bloom well only every other year?

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    1. That is Mexican hat and it blooms every year. However, it does not bloom as well when the gardener removes the plant! Earlier this year, I pulled out a lot of the plants that were growing too close and into the pathways. The Mexican hat was a casualty. I have more around the garden so it is not a total loss.

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  5. Good job! I usually miss a few points, whether doing what you did or just with presenting to a client. And a great contrast of 2012 to 2013...your 2012 looks only 50% greener than a normal year out here!

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  6. Indeed, we got some rain this spring and summer and that makes such a difference. But even in drought, good design!

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  7. Congrats on your talk - you are a wonderful teacher and have a lot to share. LOVE the hummingbird with the red yucca picture!

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