Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Well, Hello There!

Remember me? It has been over a month since my last post. No reason really. I have not felt like sitting at the computer to create a post and did not have a topic for a post either. I don't have any garden projects going on right now and have no interest in starting one in this heat.

While I sought shelter from the heat indoors with the AC running, I noticed this cotton tail rabbit doing its best to stay cool in the Golden Groundsel in the shade of a Possumhaw Holly.

On one venture into the heat, I was surprised to be greeted by flowers on a Side-Cluster Milkweed, Asclepias oenotheroides

I added this plant to the garden about five years ago and this was its first time to bloom. In fact, this is the first time that it had leaves to last past the spring. In previous years, it died to the ground by June. The Wildflower Center website says it leafs out and blooms when rains follow a dry spell. Maybe this spring's rains are the reason the plant is in bloom today. The current hot, dry weather does not seem to affect Side-Cluster Milkweed. Notice the wilted Salvias around the plant.

Looking closer, you can see how the plant gets its name. The flowers are clustered all around the sides of the stem. 

Though the flowers are not colorful, they are interesting to look at. Maybe the monarchs will find the plant interesting when they pass through in a few weeks.

And just so no one thinks I was completely lazy this summer, I did create a new Resources page for the blog. 

This is a page that answers some of the most frequently asked questions I receive about where to find native plants, where to get information about them, and how to remove a lawn. Eventually, I plan to add a tab summarizing how I removed my lawn and created my garden, but not today.

Until next time, whenever that may be...

10 comments:

  1. Hello again! I've turned into a slow blogger too. At least you've refreshed your site a bit which is more than I can say. Nice milkweed, native milkweed has been a challenge in my garden though they grow along the roads nearby.

    Cute bunny as long as it stays out of the veggie patch.

    Off to check out your resources page.

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    1. Shirley, I think I have run out of stories to tell or run out of the desire to tell them. Or maybe it is just the hot, dry season that leaves me dry too.

      I was glad to see some progress with the side cluster milkweed. I hope I get some seeds to spread. People have to look closely to see how special the milkweed is, but maybe the monarchs will be pleased.

      I forgot to mention that the some of the information in the Resources page was directed toward people in DFW. Maybe you will find a nursery you would like to visit the next time you are in the area.

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  2. No time to post all I have, though not my patio - not much there. Same as you with heat. Only home for dinner, sleep and breakfast - the rest I hole up in my office since it has good AC.

    Great resource page, by the way...I have a few to do, still in draft mode...work calls again!

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    1. Hope you can find a time for a break, David. Looking forward to some cooler temperatures. It won't be long.

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  3. Good reminder to not give up on milkweed plants, and to let them grow for several years.

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    1. Collagemama, I have wondered if it was the weather or the age of the plant that made the difference this year. Either way, it is special this year and we will see what happens next year.

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  4. I've posted recently mostly so I don't forget how I think. It certainly is a tougher row to hoe in August, when everything seems to be wilting and waiting...

    That is a wonderful native milkweed. I'm in awe that you have any. Native forms of milkweed are the great white whales of my garden experience. Though I see them growing roadside when I get away from town, so far after trying plants and seed of several different types, I have a grand total of zero plants surviving, much less blooming. I've about decided there is something in my microclimate that doesn't love a milkweed!

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    1. Hold out a little longer, TexasDeb. We should see some life in our gardens in the next month. For a plant with "weed" in its name, you would think milkweed would be easier to grow. I scatter seeds from my existing plants ever year and rarely see new seedlings. Sometimes I am surprised and see seedlings where I did not scatter seeds. They seem to grow when and where they want. Seeds also need cold-moist stratification to germinate best and I have never put forth that effort. I have five native milkweed varieties, yet the few times that I see monarch caterpillars, they are usually feeding on the Mexican milkweed. Go figure.

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  5. Welcome back! Oh I totally know how you feel-- I've been sitting on a blog post for a month+, but just haven't felt the urge to write. The good thing is that your hiatus was not in vain with that new Resources page. Can't wait to check it out!

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    1. Good to hear from you, Francisco. Send me a link if you have a gardening blog and I will add a link on my Blog Links page.

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