Friday, September 27, 2013

Fall Blooms!

Last week I questioned whether the fall blooming season would be a bust this year because of the drought and because several of the Liatris stems were dying before the flowers opened. Stems are still dying, but more stems are blooming. That, along with rain and cooler weather last weekend and more of the same predicted for this weekend, makes me a much happier gardener. Take a look around...












The non-native oxblood lilies started blooming this week. I started with three bulbs. It looks like they need to be divided soon.


Pine Muhly, Muhlenbergia dubia


Pine Muhly and Little Bluestem


The Liatris caught the attention of monarch butterflies.






Other butterflies visiting the garden are American Lady


and Common Buckeye


This damselfly is almost the same shade of blue as the flowers of Pitcher Sage, Salvia azurea.






Clammyweed, Polanisia dodecandra.


This is my third or fourth attempt over the years to try Pigeonberry, Rivina humilis. It is a shade loving plant in the pokeweed family that forms a 1 foot tall and wide bush. Mine always die before they get that large, so I bought a larger plant this time around. Pigeonberry has small spikes of white to pink flowers that are followed by berries.


The berries change from green to white to red and are a favorite of many bird species.


This yellow flowered plant is a mystery. It appeared on its own last year and returned again this year.


The plant grows about two feet tall and has narrow leaves along the lower portion of the stems. The flowers are about the diameter of a pencil eraser. Any ideas as to what this plant might be? Thanks Rock rose for identifying Prairie Broomweed, Amphiachyris dracunculoides.

11 comments:

  1. Great plants and great blooms , Michael. Some of your best ever. I also have that spidery plant in the last pic in one of the prairie patches and have wondered what it is, I`ll include it in my next post.Maybe the kind people who see name that plant on Garden Web can help.

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    1. It is turning out better than I expected, Randy. Not much else blooming yet because I severely pruned some of the plants a little too late in the season, but I think they will begin blooming within the next couple of weeks. I think Rock Rose identified our mystery plants.

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  2. What a stunning scene. So glad your liatris surprised you. I think the yellow plant is prairie broom weed. It is a fall bloomer in my garden too and perfect for yours.

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    1. Thanks for the ID of the prairie broom. I kept thinking broom something but could not put my finger on the correct name. It is amazing what plants will appear on their own when you let nature do its thing. I have a few unidentified asters that made their first appearance last year will be blooming soon. Maybe you can help ID them too?

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  3. Utterly gorgeous pictures of what looks to be an outstanding garden! I am surprised the Oxblood lilies are so hardy so far north! do they get summer water? The Muhlenbergia dubia is new to me: have you tried M. reverchonii? Glad the rains came (we got almost 10" in the last month in Denver!)...so many similarities in the prairie flora. Is the shrub prickly pear Opuntia engelmanii?

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    1. Acantholimon, oxblood lilies are pretty tough. They are often found growing in abandoned homesites. I don’t intentionally water mine, although they may get some when I water the other plants. We are considered USDA Zone 8 now, but back in the good old days when we were Zone 7, they still did fine with the winters. I have one Seep Muhly, Muhlenbergia reverchonii. It is not overly impressive in my garden. Kind of like a less colorful version of M. capillaris. The cactus was sold as “wimpy prickly pear”. Based on my research, I think it is Opuntia cacanapa 'Ellisiana’. Hope you did not have any problems with all that rain.

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  4. Your garden looks so beautiful and your photos are amazing. Interesting what happens when you stop mowing and spraying, I have had several native plants just show up and start growing like your prairie broom has.

    No Monarchs here yet, the Liatris is beginning to fade so I hope they hurry up! I have other plants for them at least.

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    1. Shirley, I have probably removed some good native plants because I thought they were weeds. Since I realized so many potential garden plants are just appearing, I have stopped automatically removing unrecognizable plants until I can determine whether they will be a “weed”. It sounds like it will not be a good year for the monarchs. I have seen about 5 at one time. The peak in this area should be within the next couple of weeks.

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  5. Yes the Monarchs are in full migration here. Heading your way. Which Liatris is that? They look like spicata but mine always bloom in June/July for a brief period.

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  6. greggo, the Liatris came from a native plant sale and were not identified. I think they are probably Liatris mucronata. I have some spicata (the native plant that is grown in Holland, shipped to the US and sold in grocery and home improvement stores in the spring). My spicata usually bloom in June too.

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  7. They look great. I'll probably be adding L.pycnostachya ,punctata, and aspera. Love mucronata however. You definitely do not want honeydew milkvine in the garden. I've had it almost in every garden, I hate it until now.

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