Thursday, April 7, 2016

A Garden In Recovery

It has been two weeks since the hail storm.

To the casual observer, everything looks pretty good. 

But if you look a little closer, you can see some of the damage on the north side of this cactus. 

The damage is much more evident on the other side of the cactus. Most of the flat sides of the paddles face the east and west to maximize the amount of sunshine received. When the hail fell from the west, they hit the tender paddles like ice ping pong balls. This damage will never disappear. 

Most of the leaves on this yucca are shredded. 


This agave received more damage than I originally thought, but it still looks pretty good, especially surrounded by four nerve daisies.

The bluebonnets in the parkway were laying flat after the hail storm and many stems were broken. There are still large areas that look like a buffalo laid on them.

But overall, they recovered well and will produce enough seeds for a new crop of plants for next year.  

10 comments:

  1. How long will it take for the cacti to look right?

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    1. Collagemama, I think they will carry those spots as long as those paddles are on the plants. I have wondered if I need to cut back the plants and let them start over. Maybe someone will share their experience with cactus and hail. This is a new one for me.

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  2. Well, at least you'll have a good story for the cactus over the years. Otherwise, the garden looks pretty darn good from a computer screen!

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    1. Considering the damage the hail did to everything, it all looks pretty good, Misti. Especially, now, about six weeks after the damage.

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  3. Looking much better and no surprises with the flowering plants bouncing back. Those prickly pear battle scars are there for good. I took several large arms off an opuntia near the ground about six months ago and I see no signs of new paddles growing back around the base scar where they detached. You would need to leave at least the bottom level if not two. Since most of the damage seems to be on the house side, try taking just a few of the worst ones at a time and see what happens.

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    1. Shirley, thanks for the advice on the cactus. I think I am going to leave it alone and see what happens. The wounds are not quite as noticeable now that they are turning a grayish color.

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  4. Ouch! Those scars. I can share your pain because I have them too. But considering the beating your garden got it has recovered remarkably. It looks as though the bluebonnets will be able to continue with seed production. I had to look this morning because saw some devastating shots of the hail storm 2 nights ago and thought of you. I hope it missed you this time.

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    1. Rock rose, I did receive some small hail in that last storm. Fortunately, I did not receive the softball sized hail that fell a little further east of me. I am ready for hail season to end.

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  5. Michael, I'm sorry about the damage to your garden. Many of my agaves bear hail scars from a storm last year. It's frustrating, but I try to look at it as "garden patina." Gardening in Texas ain't for sissies, as they say. Luckily the plants are tough!

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    1. Pam, to look at the garden now, you would never know about the hail damage unless you saw it on the cactus, yuccas, agaves, and trees. I hope the garden does not get any more patina this year.

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